Inventor Spotlight: ecoLogic Studio

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Check out these living sculptures from London-based architectural and urban design firm, ecoLogicStudio.

ecoLogicStudio takes a multi-perspective approach to their work, seeking to integrate the slow process of natural systems with the speedy processes of technological ones.

I love it when a design firm posts a manifesto on their about page. Here’s a taste:

We are not satisfied with the current level of engagement of the discipline of architecture towards the global ecological crisis: we believe that a critical as well as active role for architecture is necessary in order for the discipline to have an impact; we believe this role can be achieved by refusing to hide into the production of fictional scenarios, and by engaging with the organisation of matter, energy and information across scales and regimes.

Multiscalarity is critical to this new systemic comprehension of architecture and the “city”; we can experiment with new regional planning protocols by for instance re-framing the growth or farming of micro-algal organism across natural habitats, inhibiting or stimulating their proliferation in the landscape or in custom designed artificial systems, while incubating the emergence of related business ecologies [see the Regional Algae Farm project presented later].

 

TAKE IT FURTHER

Responsive Landscapes

Inside Smart Geometry

Slow Design on wikipedia

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The Economic and Environmental Impacts of Bitcoin Mining

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former aluminum plant via ZigZag podcast

The folks at ZigZag podcast have been reporting a series of stories about a bitcoin mine up in The North Country of New York State. The mine they are reporting on sits on the Moses Saunders Dam on the St. Lawrence River. This dam, built in the mid 20th century, attracted companies like GM and Reynolds Aluminum to build and operate factories there. Today these factories are being converted to bitcoin mines which on the surface seems kind of cool, but it’s worth a deeper look.

Economic impact. Bitcoin mines extract an insane amount of value for their owners. But as for labor, its computers that do most of the work in the mines, not people. This means that the job numbers that come with these mines aren’t as high as they were with aluminum plants. Even though we know we are in the age of automation, there’s some confusion in how town and city officials negotiate deals with incoming mine operators because they, the officials, have a hard time understanding bitcoin.

Here’s an idea for these folks: since the “new job” numbers are likely to be low in this sector, explore other options for extracting value from the mine for people in your town. If it’s not jobs, what is it? A one time expense for the mine, like a community baseball field, might not be the best fit. Look for ways to extract value over the lifetime of the company in a way that paychecks do.

Environmental impact. Mining bitcoin is energy intensive. Much more so than producing physical goods. However, this impact is something that most of us don’t think about because bitcoin and other crypto goods are digital and seem abstract. But make no mistake, the impacts they have on the physical environment and human health are real.

There is some hope if we use a triple bottom line lens for crypto. Triple bottom line considers economic, environmental, and social impacts of business activity. There are some experiments that use crypto to track the environmental and economic impact of its use, then use that data to make it better. But this innovation will only happen if we choose to do make it a priority. In the meantime, let’s be wide awake about the systemic impacts of bitcoin and other digital goods.

 

TAKE IT FURTHER

Energy cost of ‘mining’ bitcoin more than twice that of copper or gold
(The Guardian, Nov 2018)

on streaming:
Greenpeace says binge-watching all those TV shows is bad for the environment
(Quartz, Jan 2017)

a call for innovation:
Cryptocurrency mining could become the new face of energy storage
(World Economic Forum, Sep 2018)

Kids Build a Bakery in the Forest

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Brawn & Bread by Studio Micat

Bread & Brawn is an outdoor, human-powered bakery designed by Studio Micat and built by kids in a New England summer camp. Human-power is used to mill the grain, knead the bread, and stoke the fire. What a lovely project for children to build and use. This project affords a design experience that nurtures a sense of appreciation for how many resources go into making seemingly simple, everyday items.

See more detail on the project here and here

A superfund to address the negative impacts of social media?

Check out this interview with investor and author Roger McNamee. McNamee’s written and recently published, Zucked: Waking up to the Facebook Catastrophe in which he articulates his thoughts on the negative impacts that facebook has on our economy, media, public health, and our brains. He argues that the gov’t needs to respond to these impacts as they responded to industrial pollution in the late 1970s – they created a system to hold companies accountable for cleaning up the mess.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

  1. Delete your facebook account or, at least, don’t use it as your primary news source
  2. Curate your own news feed with an RSS reader like feedly
  3. Subscribe to and support quality journalism like WNYC’s On the Media
  4. Tell your reps that they need to address these issues at a policy level. (And if they need help getting up to speed, encourage them to reach out to you or someone you know who is tech savvy and a clear communicator)

Artist Spotlight: Craig Mains

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trailers at sea via craigmains.com

This weekend I’m taking a printmaking workshop with Craig Mains at The Ink Shop here in Ithaca. I dig Mains’ work and have for a while now.

In the workshop, Mains is going to show us how he integrates a vinyl cutter into his printmaking process. I have a vinyl cutter in my studio. It’s one of my favorite tools. I’m looking forward to learning how I can expand my use of it.

Check out some of Mains’ prints on his website: http://craigmains.com/printmaking