A decade of food pictures

toms and peaches

As a designer interested in sustainability, I’ve learned a lot of lessons from food system innovators. And as a daughter of a mother who owned and operated a catering business called Gorgeous Food, well, I think food is gorgeous.

So I have a lot of food photos. I used to share them on facebook but since I am cutting back on social media these days, I’ve gathered a bunch of those photos into this google album. Enjoy!

If you’d like to use some of my pictures for something of your own, you may do so as long as you attribute the image(s) to me with a link to this blog.

 

TAKE IT FURTHER

Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food on PBS

some of my favorite regional food makers:

Sweet Land Farm (our CSA)

Good Food Collective (innovative distributor in ROC)

Greenstar Coop

New Hope Mills (the pancakes!)

Wiemer Vineyard

Lively Run Goat Dairy

 

 

From Self-Esteem to Self-Compassion

In the field of psychology, there has been a shift in nurturing self-esteem in children to nurturing self-compassion. You can see evidence of this shift in the popularity of books by Brene Brown and Carol Dweck and the rising interest in mindfulness practice, especially in schools.

What’s wrong with teaching self-esteem? It has been proven to breed narcissism and unkind behavior toward others. It motivates people to put others down in order to prop themselves up. And high self-esteem can have a negative effect on how we react in difficult situations. This is not the outcome we really want or need these days.

Enter Self-compassion. Dr. Kristin Neff articulates three elements of self-compassion:

  1. Self-Kindness vs. Self-Judgment. This means being kind to ourselves when we struggle or fail rather than judging ourselves too harshly which can result in a downward spiral of self-criticism. Self-kindness has us respond to failure like so, “This is hard right now. How can I pay attention to how hard it is and move through it?”
  2. Common Humanity vs. Isolation. This means that when we struggle we realize that we aren’t the only person in the universe in this situation. When we struggle, it’s good to remember that we all struggle. This helps us feel less alone and keeps us from falling into a downward spiral of isolation.
  3. Mindfulness vs. Overidentification. This means that when we struggle, we keep it in perspective. It’s the difference in thinking, “I did something stupid” (mindful) rather than “I am stupid” (overidentification). When we are mindful about our struggles, flaws, and failures, we understand that we don’t always behave perfectly but this doesn’t mean that we are “bad.” We’re just human.

When we shift from self-esteem to self-compassion, we create a kinder world together. That said, many systems still reward narcissistic, hyper-individualistic behavior (grades, for example) and I’m not sure how to navigate that in the context of this shift. What do you think? It’s a doozy of a problem, for sure.

 

TAKE IT FURTHER

NYSED.GOV report on Mindfulness in Education, July 2018

What Self-Compassion is Not

Change Agents and Distractions

January 1st is a day that a lot of people choose to set new goals for themselves or recommit to old goals that they’ve gotten away from. Now, I’m not saying that you should set goals at the start of the new year. But if you do use this time to think about and set goals (I do), then there is a pair of terms that can help you stay on track: change agents and distractions.

CHANGE AGENTS. This is an exercise in answering the question, “Why now?” That is to say, once you know what your goal is, articulate why now is the time to do it. What has changed in your life to make now the right time? An example might be, “My kids are finally [X age] so I can put more energy into starting a business” OR “I spent the last five years learning about Y and now I’m ready to build on that knowledge and pursue Z goal.” You want to identify change agents so that you can say with confidence “Now is the time.” And when you fall off track, as we all do, you can articulate the change agent to remind yourself why you are well positioned to recommit.

DISTRACTIONS. These often come in the form of sunk costs. Sunk costs are things that happened in the past that we can’t do anything about. Yet they haunt us. They sound like: “I should have done this. Why didn’t I do that?” I really struggle with the distraction of sunk costs. But I find that having a name for them and knowing that they have their own agenda–to distract me from my goals–helps me see them more clearly and find the clarity to move on. Distractions will always be there. The trick here is to train yourself to not let them get in the driver’s seat. Keep ’em buckled up in the back.

Good luck with setting and working on goals if this is something that you do. If your goals feel a little scary, then you have set some good ones! Remind yourself of change agents and call distractions by their name to stay on track.

TAKE IT FURTHER

Check out https://seths.blog/ for some great reads on change management